Dating antique jars

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This bottle dating "key" is a relatively simple "first cut" on the dating of a bottle.While running a bottle through the key questions, the user is frequently directed to move to other website pages to explain diagnostic features and concepts as well as to add depth and/or precision to the initial dating estimate.The author created this website as a BLM employee and continues to update and enhance the site in retirement as a volunteer.This website now has a permanent home courtesy of the Society for Historical Archaeology (SHA). This entire website is essentially a "key" - albeit a complex one - to the dating and typing (typology) of historic bottles.Once the likely bottle age or date range is determined, some examples of other places to look for more information is provided.: -It is about 9" (23 cm) in height and 2 3/8th inches (6 cm) in diameter.-It is made of thick, heavy glass for its size, weighing almost 1 lb.These diagrams should help clarify age differences based on both form and function.

The following charts and pictures on the dating bottles pages listed below should help.

This site instead attempts to help the user determine some key facts - approximate age & function - about any given utilitarian* bottle/jar based on observable physical characteristics.

Hundreds of specific historic bottles are used as examples within the pages of this website to illustrate the concepts discussed; with luck you may find the specific bottle you have an interest in discussed though typically you will not.

One can find quite a bit of information on my web site and across the Internet about dating bottles based on whether the mold seam goes up and over the lip or if the bottle has a 'pontil' on the base.

Even given these descriptions beginning often mistake a machine made Owen ring on the base of a bottle with a pontil.

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